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Nicole Kobie

Journalist

London

Nicole Kobie

Freelance journalist covering tech, transport and science
Contributing editor to Wired UK and Futures editor at PC Pro.
Bylines in New Scientist, Teen Vogue, WebUser, Computer Shopper, Computer Active, Grazia, Big Issue, the Outline, IT Pro, Alphr and more.

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Is This The Beginning Of The End For Facebook?

Last week's Observer investigation struck at the heart of social media with its revelations, but will it prove the wake-up call needed to regulate the internet? Wired contributor Nicole Kobie reports... A pink-haired whistleblower, hidden-camera confessions and regime- changing propaganda. Data privacy stories aren’t normally plotted like a spy thriller, but this had it all.
Grazia Link to Story
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FBI Webcam Surveillance: What You Should Know

Does an FBI agent sit all day watching you through your webcam? Twitter loves the idea, turning it into a meme about special agents helping surveilled subjects through relationships, advising on selfies, and offering a "bless you" after sneezing. As amusing as it is to imagine some poor wretch has to watch your day-to-day routine — singing along to YouTube, searching for your ex on Instagram, and being depressed about breakups — the suddenly popular meme has origins in real-life privacy invasions.
Teen VOGUE Link to Story
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Why Google Duplex Calls Should Concern All of Us

Too lazy to call the salon for an appointment or make a reservation at your favorite restaurant? Let Google do it for you. Earlier this week at Google's developer conference, CEO Sundar Pichai demonstrated a new feature in Google Assistant called Duplex. The automated voice assistant calls a salon to book a hair appointment, dropping in "ums" and "ahs" to sound like natural human speech — the person on the other end of the phone acted naturally, though of course the demo was a recording and not live.
Teen VOGUE Link to Story
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Nobody is safe from Russia's colossal hacking operation

o-one is too unimportant to be targeted by Russia-backed, state-sponsored hackers. While that may be good for the self-esteem, it's bad news for online security — enough so that this week US and UK authorities teamed up to issue a joint warning about communications infrastructure, including home-office routers.
Wired UK Link to Story
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How to See All Your Google Data

Facebook is under fire for data sharing, but it's of course not the only tech giant slurping up our information — Google's also hungry to know everything it can about us. And we clearly find it alarming: a tweet by developer Dylan Curran that details the data collected by Facebook and Google has been shared over 136,000 times and liked more than 211,000 more times, suggesting once-dull privacy settings have gone viral.
Teen VOGUE Link to Story
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How to Delete Facebook Accounts

Facebook has long been accused of privacy missteps, and more recently of helping spread fake news — now, it's charged with leaving our information in the hands of a political data mining company for more than two years. Why on earth are any of us still using it? That's a question plenty are asking after the Cambridge Analytica revelations, which revealed Facebook data was hoovered up and used to target voters in the last presidential election.
Teen VOGUE Link to Story
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Against a torrent of digital abuse, women are taking back control

Eva Galperin spends her mornings sifting through stories of abuse, helping victims who have been hacked by their harassers take back control of their accounts and devices. "I talk to about seven or eight people a day, and walk them through what’s going on, why they think they might be compromised, and what is compromised, and what we can do about it," she says.
Wired UK Link to Story
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In following China's iCloud law, has Apple betrayed itself?

Apple's move to store user iCloud data locally in China was inevitable; it's merely following the law. But if the powerful tech leaders of Silicon Valley can't stand up for customers rights in China, who can? Apple yesterday shifted its Chinese iCloud storage to a local company, for the first time hosting the encryption keys for that data in China rather than the US.
Wired UK Link to Story

About

Nicole Kobie

You may have seen my work at PC Pro, where I edit the Futures section, on Wired UK, where I'm a contributing editor, or in WebUser, where I write the news pages. I also regularly contribute to Teen Vogue, The Outline, CityMetric, New Scientist, Alphr, Vice's Motherboard, IT Pro and Cloud Pro, Computer Shopper, and the Telegraph, and have written for Mental Floss, Ars Technica, Trusted Reviews, MacUser, Computer Active, The Calgary Herald, the Guardian, and more.

I’m a creative, hard-working digital and print journalist, currently specialising in technology, science and transport stories, but happy to write about anything -- even Theresa May coughing.

I focus on high-quality news and features stories, explaining complicated topics with clean, precise writing. I work quickly, write accurately and, perhaps most importantly, hit my deadlines.

Aside from writing and editing, I've had training in investigative journalism, data journalism and photojournalism, and used to be a regular on PC Pro's podcast.

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Skills

  • journalism
  • writing
  • editing
  • news
  • features
  • blogging
  • columns
  • photojournalism
  • photography
  • technology
  • spending hours at the pub
  • Being retweeted by Snowden